Thyroid Functions
Hypothyroidism


The Thyroid Gland

The thyroid gland is an important organ that regulates body metabolism. It is located in the front of the neck just below the voice box (larynx). The thyroid gland secretes two main thyroid hormones – thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). The secretion of T3 and T4 by the thyroid is controlled by a feedback mechanism involving the Pituitary gland, a small organ at the base of the brain, and the Hypothalamus, a structure in the brain. The pathway for thyroid hormone is therefore:
Hypothal. >> Pit. >> Thyroid Gland, produce thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) hormones. 

Thyroid Disorders as Hypothyroidism, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Hyperthyroidism may be Hormone Imbalance.
The good news is, these disorders respond well to Bioidentical Hormones Restoration Therapy (BHRT)
 

PELLET BHRT more closely mimics the body's way of delivering these hormones to the organs in need.  Hence, it is the preferred method of Hormone Replacement therapy. 

To successfully treat Hormone Imbalance, use Natural/Bioidentical Hormones for true relief.

 So, your thyroid gland produces two main hormones, thyroxine and triiodothyronine, that influence every cell in your body. They maintain the rate at which your body uses fats and carbohydrates, help control your body temperature, influence your heart rate and help regulate the production of protein. Your thyroid gland also produces calcitonin, a hormone that helps regulate the amount of calcium in your blood.

The rate at which thyroxine and triiodothyronine are released is controlled by your pituitary gland and your hypothalamus — an area at the base of your brain that acts as a thermostat for your whole system. Here's how the process works:

The hypothalamus signals your pituitary gland to make a hormone called thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Your pituitary gland then releases TSH — the amount depends on how much thyroxine and triiodothyronine are in your blood. If you don't have enough thyroxine or triiodothyronine in your blood, your TSH blood level will be above normal; if you have too much, your TSH level will fall below normal. Finally, your thyroid gland regulates its production of hormones based on the amount of TSH it receives.As long as your thyroid releases the proper amounts of these hormones, your system functions normally. But sometimes your thyroid doesn't produce enough hormones, upsetting the balance of chemical reactions in your body. This condition is known as Hypothyroidism. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis or underactive thyroid disease, is the most devastating hypothyroid disorder. Other times, your thyroid gland may produce too much of the hormone thyroxine — causing Hyperthyroidism or overactive thyroid disease. 

To get started now, fill our FREE Hormone Profile Survey  or just scroll down and read more.

There are four main types of thyroid diseases:

  •  Hyperthyroidism -- too much thyroid hormone
  • Hypothyroidism --Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- too little thyroid hormone
  • Benign (non-cancerous) thyroid disease
  • Thyroid cancer

 The emphasis here is on Hypothyroidism -- Hoshimoto's Thyroiditis-- and Hyperthyroidism 

Hypothyroidism:--Hoshimoto's Thyroiditis.

Your thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of your neck, just below your Adam's apple. Hormones produced by the thyroid gland have an enormous impact on your health, affecting all aspects of your metabolism — from the rate at which your heart beats to how quickly you burn calories.

As long as your thyroid releases the proper amounts of these hormones, your system functions normally. But sometimes your thyroid doesn't produce enough hormones, upsetting the balance of chemical reactions in your body. This condition is known as hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid disease.

 Women, especially those over age 50, are more likely to have hypothyroidism than men are. Hypothyroidism seldom causes symptoms in the early stages, but over time, untreated hypothyroidism can cause a number of health problems, such as obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease.

The good news is that accurate thyroid function tests are available to diagnose hypothyroidism, and treatment of hypothyroidism with Bioidentical thyroid hormones is usually simple and effective once the proper dosage is established. 
 

Signs and Symptoms of Hypothyroidism:

 The signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism vary widely, depending on the severity of the hormone deficiency. But in general, any problems you do have tend to develop slowly, often over a number of years.

At first, you may barely notice symptoms such as fatigue and sluggishness, or you may simply attribute them to getting older. But as your metabolism continues to slow, you may develop more obvious signs and symptoms, including:

  • Increased sensitivity to cold
  • Constipation
  • Pale, dry skin
  • A puffy face
  • Hoarse voice
  • An elevated blood cholesterol level
  • Unexplained weight gain
  • Muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness
  • Pain, stiffness or swelling in your joints
  • Muscle weakness
  • Heavier than normal menstrual periods
  • Depression
  • Obesity
  • joint pain
  • infertility
  • heart disorders

When hypothyroidism isn't treated, signs and symptoms can gradually become more severe. Constant stimulation of your thyroid to release more hormones may lead to an enlarged thyroid - goiter. In addition, you may become more forgetful, your thought processes may slow or you may feel depressed.

Advanced hypothyroidism, known as myxedema, is rare, but when it occurs it can be life-threatening. Signs and symptoms include low blood pressure, decreased breathing, decreased body temperature, unresponsiveness and even coma. In some cases, myxedema can be fatal.

To get started now, fill our FREE Hormone Profile Survey  or just scroll down and read more.

 Risk factors

Although anyone can develop hypothyroidism, it occurs mainly in women older than 50, and the risk of developing the disorder increases with age. You also have an increased risk, if you:

  • Have a close relative, such as a parent or grandparent, with an autoimmune disease
  • Have been treated with radioactive iodine or anti-thyroid medications
  • Received radiation to your neck or upper chest
  • Have had thyroid surgery (partial thyroidectomy

Screening and Dagnosis

In general, your doctor may test for an underactive thyroid if you're feeling increasingly tired or sluggish, have dry skin, constipation and a hoarse voice, or have had previous thyroid problems or goiter.

Blood tests

Diagnosis of hypothyroidism is based on your symptoms and the results of blood tests that measure the level of TSH and the levels of the thyroid hormones, T-4 andT-3. A low level of T-4 and high level of TSH indicate an underactive thyroid. That's because your pituitary produces more TSH in an effort to stimulate your thyroid gland into producing more thyroid hormone.

In the past, doctors weren't able to detect hypothyroidism until symptoms were fairly advanced. But by using the sensitive TSH test, doctors are able to diagnose thyroid disorders much earlier — often before you ever experience symptoms. Because the TSH test is the best screening test, your doctor will likely check TSH first and follow with a thyroid hormone test if needed. TSH tests also play an important role in managing hypothyroidism. They help your doctor determine the right dosage of medication, both initially and over time.

In addition, TSH tests are used to help diagnose a condition called subclinical hypothyroidism, which usually causes no outward signs or symptoms. In this condition, you have normal blood levels of T-3 and T-4, but higher than normal levels of TSH.

 Your thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of your neck, just below your Adam's apple. Hormones produced by the thyroid gland have an enormous impact on your health, affecting all aspects of your metabolism — from the rate at which your heart beats to how quickly you burn calories.

As long as your thyroid releases the proper amounts of these hormones, your system functions normally. But sometimes your thyroid doesn't produce enough hormones, upsetting the balance of chemical reactions in your body. This condition is known as hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid disease.

Women, especially those over age 50, are more likely to have hypothyroidism than men are. Hypothyroidism seldom causes symptoms in the early stages, but over time, untreated hypothyroidism can cause a number of health problems, such as obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease.

The good news is that accurate thyroid function tests are available to diagnose hypothyroidism, and treatment of hypothyroidism with Bioidentical thyroid hormones is usually simple and effective once the proper dosage is established.
 
To get started now, fill our FREE Hormone Profile Survey  or just scroll down and read more.


 Management of Hypothyroidism: 

Under active thyroid causes Hormone Imbalance and requires replacement of thyroid hormones. Although  synthetic thyroid hormone levothyroxine is used, we recommend using Natural, Bioidentical Thyroid Hormones for Hormone Replacement.   

Hormone Imbalance includes much more than the symptoms addressed in this section on  thyroids. Other symptoms that may be related to Hormone Imbalance include:

  • acne 
  • bloating
  • lack of sex drive 
  • decreased energy 
  • depression
  • decreased libido
  • endometriosis
  • erectile disfunction
  • forgetfulness
  • fatigue (adrenal, chronic)
  • fibromyalgia
  • hair loss
  • headaches 
  • high blood pressure 
  • high cholesterol
  • hot flashes
  • increased appetite
  • increased blood sugar levels
  • sugar craving
  • nicotine and alcohol cravings
  • increased facial hair
  • insomnia 
  • impotence
  • irritability
  • loss of lean muscle tissue
  • loss of bone mass
  • lower back problems
  • menopause problems (pre-, post-, peri-,) 
  • mood swings
  • muscle weakness
  • night sweat 
  • ovarian disorders (cysts)
  • periods - painful and/or heavy 
  • sleep disturbance
  • thyroid disorders (hyper, hypo,)
  • uterine problems (fibroids)
  • vaginal dryness
  • weight gain

Hyperthyroidism:

Hyperthyroidism can significantly accelerate your body's metabolism, causing sudden weight loss, a rapid or irregular heartbeat, sweating, and nervousness or irritability.

Reasons for Hyperthyroidism:
Normally, your thyroid gland releases the right amount of hormones, but sometimes it produces too much thyroxine. This may occur for a number of reasons, including:

  • Graves' disease. The cause of most hyperthyroidism is Graves' Disease, an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies produced by your immune system stimulate your thyroid to produce too much thyroxine. Normally, your immune system uses antibodies to help protect against viruses, bacteria and other foreign substances that invade your body. In Graves' disease, antibodies mistakenly attack your thyroid gland and occasionally the tissue behind your eyes and the skin of your lower legs over the shins. Scientists aren't sure exactly what causes Graves' disease, although several factors — including a genetic predisposition — are likely involved. Sometimes your thyroid gland can become inflamed for unknown reasons. The inflammation can cause excess thyroid hormone stored in the gland to leak into your bloodstream. One rare type of thyroiditis, known as subacute thyroiditis, causes pain in the thyroid gland. Other types are painless and may sometimes occur after pregnancy (postpartum thyroiditis). 
  • Hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules: (toxic adenoma, toxic multinodular goiter, Plummer's disease). 
    This form of hyperthyroidism occurs when one or more adenomas of your thyroid produce too much thyroxine. An adenoma is a part of the gland that has walled itself off from the rest of the gland, forming noncancerous (benign) lumps that may cause an enlargement of the thyroid. Not all adenomas produce excess thyroxine, and doctors aren't sure what causes some to begin producing too much hormone.
  •  Thyroiditis. Sometimes your thyroid gland can become inflamed for unknown reasons. The inflammation can cause excess thyroid hormone stored in the gland to leak into your bloodstream. One rare type of thyroiditis, known as subacute thyroiditis, causes pain in the thyroid gland. Other types are painless and may sometimes occur after pregnancy (postpartum thyroiditis

To get started now, fill our FREE Hormone Profile Survey  or just scroll down and read more.

Signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism 

Hyperthyroidism can mimic other health problems, which may make it difficult for your doctor to diagnose. It can also cause a wide variety of signs and symptoms, including:

  • Sudden weight loss, even when your appetite and food intake remain normal or increase
  • Rapid heartbeat (tachycardia) — commonly more than 100 beats a minute — irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) or pounding of your heart (palpitations)
  • Nervousness, anxiety or anxiety attacks, irritability
  • Tremor — usually a fine trembling in your hands and fingers
  • Sweating
  • Changes in menstrual patterns
  • Increased sensitivity to heat
  • Changes in bowel patterns, especially more frequent bowel movements
  • An enlarged thyroid gland (goiter), which may appear as a swelling at the base of your neck
  • Fatigue, muscle weakness
  • Difficulty sleeping  

 Older adults are more likely to have either no symptoms or subtle ones, such as an increased heart rate, heat intolerance and a tendency to become tired during ordinary activities. Medications called beta blockers, which are used to treat high blood pressure and other conditions, can mask many of the symptoms of hyperthyroidis

Diagnosis

Hyperthyroidism is diagnosed using your medical history, a physical exam and blood tests. During the exam your doctor may try to detect a slight tremor in your fingers when they're extended, overactive reflexes, eye changes and warm, moist skin. Your doctor will also examine your thyroid gland as you swallow.

The diagnosis can be confirmed with blood tests that measure the levels of thyroxine and TSH in your blood. High levels of thyroxine and low or nonexistent amounts of TSH indicate an overactive thyroid. The amount of TSH is important because it's the hormone that signals your thyroid gland to produce more thyroxine. These tests are particularly necessary for older adults, who may not have classic symptoms of hyperthyroidism

To get started now, fill our FREE Hormone Profile Survey  or just scroll down and read more.

To successfully treat Hormone Imbalance, use Natural/Bioidentical Hormones compounded just for you.

To learn how Bioidentical Hormone Restoration will work for you, click here, or scroll down and continue to read.

BIOIDENTICAL HORMONE RESTORATION IS A SAFE AND EFFECTIVE WAY TO MANAGE HORMONE IMBALANCE.

For more about Bioidentical Hormones, BHRT:
click here

How do I get started?

Step 1:    Take the Hormone Profile Survey  It Is Free

Step 2:      Get Tested.

Based on the information in your profile you will be advised what hormones need to be tested.  You wil be sent the appropriate test kit.  If  you are interested in Pellet BHRT where the hormones are painlessly inserted under the skin for 4-6 months of symptoms relief, you will require a blood test.  If you are interested in Traditional BHRT, which requires taking the hormones daily, you will need a saliva test. 

 Step 3:      Consultation With Dr. Camille Semple-Daly
Board Certified in OB/GYN

(Sotto Pelle Certified Physician)

When we receive your test results, (approximately 2 weeks after the lab receives your sample), you will be contacted to arrange a consultation with the doctor.  For your convenience, this may take the form of an office visit or by telephone.  For those interested in Pellet Therapy, consultations can only be done in my office, for implation of the hormone pellets.

Step 4:      Management Plan.

In the case of Traditional BHRT, a prescription will be sent to our compounding pharmacist, (or a compounding pharmacy of your choice), based on the results of your consultation, symptoms and salivary test.  Our bioidentical hormone restoration plan is individualized specifically for you.  Our therapy is never mass produced. One size does not fit all.

Step 5:      Continued Plan of Care

At the time of your consultation a detailed care plan will be provided.  This will be based on the consultation with the physician, your symptoms and test results.  All care plans are based on your own needs, and include an evaluation of Nutrition, Exercise and Lifestyle choices.

 To get started with the hormone profile survey
click here.

IF YOU ARE IN THE U.S WE CAN SERVE YOU, BUT OUR TARGET REGION IS: 
New York, New Jersey, Pensylvania, Delaware, Maryland & Washington D.C.
 

For questions, or to schedule a consultation, please contact us:
Toll Free: 1-866-376-9861
Tel:     1-856-380-1330
Fax:    1-856-380-0835

info@ReplenishHormones.com

 Call Replenish Center for Natural/Bioidentical Hormone Restoration today !!